Library Book Haul

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You know how it goes. You just got a huge stack of books from your birthday, then you collected a stack of books over the course of a couple weeks, then you think “Gee, the library book sale is coming up!? Sign me up!” I swear, I normally don’t buy this many books, but to be fair (to myself) they’ve all been super cheap. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

T H E   H A U L

Mosquitoland by David Arnold | I’ve been wanting to read more road trip books and this one might fit the bill. This book is about a girl who has to travel across the US to see her sick mother. It sounds like it may be sad, so who knows when I’ll get to this one.

The Woodcutter by Kate Danley | I’m not sure why I got this one… I have it on my Kobo because I think I got a free ebook somewhere? But I’m never going to read it on my Kobo, so I decided to get the physical copy that I’m probably never going to read? Logic.

The Callahan Chronicles by Spider Robinson | Oof, this cover, man. I tried getting a good picture of the illustration along the bottom of the cover and I love it. I love the idea of an alien bar, and that is literally all I know about this bind up. Also, badass author name.

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Jirel of Joiry by C.L. Moore | Yeah, I already own this in a bindup. So? Just look at this badass cover! I had to do some major tumblr sleuthing to find this tumblr post that inspired me to buy C.L. Moore’s books in the first place. She’s credited as the creator of the space western, so I’m here for this.

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Murder for Christmas edited by Thomas Godfrey | This is apparently a short story collection of Christmas-related stories. Authors include Thomas Hardy, Damon Runyon, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, Charles Dickens, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Woody Allen, so we’ll see how it goes when I pick it up in December.

I also picked up a few classics. I’ve been toying with the idea of reading classics and the library book sale is so cheap. I picked up Lord of the Flies by William Golding, The Parasites by Daphne du Maurier, Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë.

 

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